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Category Archives: overdue

Postdates: Separating Fact from Fiction


So I am now 41 weeks pregnant, and the most common question I am getting is ‘so when are you being induced?’  On facebook, I answered that question ten times over a period of 3 days, so ended up making a new status message that consisted of this:
 
Thankyou for all your questions, thoughts and concerns regarding induction. I am comfortable, and bub is comfortable. I still have 1 more week before I am officially post-term. I will not be getting induced naturally or medically at any stage unless medically indicated. Now no more talk of induction! 😀
But I know that the people who were asking, were only asking and suggesting things because they care about me.  So I looked around and found this fantastic article that has some great research and simple facts that you can share with others.  This link was my status update this morning. This is how I introduced it:
 
Here’s some interesting research regarding ‘late babies’:
“Facts:
• A pregnancy is NOT “Postdates” until after 42 weeks.
• The risk of stillbirth is nearly a flat line between 38 weeks and 43.
• Amniotic fluid is dependent on maternal hydration, in the absence of congenital abnormalities.
• A baby’s weight virtually plateaus after 40 weeks.”
Good to know hey! 🙂 Read the rest of this entry »
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Official recommendations


Here’s a bit of research I have undertaken to find out what the official guidelines are on these potentially contentious issues. Long Pregnancies, PROM, Electronic Fetal Monitoring, Breech Birth and VBAC.  I wanted to find more official guidelines on different topics, but I couldn’t think of more topics to look up!  It’s always good to know what the professional organisations recommend, compared to what your doctor is recommending.
 

ACOG (American College of Obstetricians & Gynecologists) on
Long pregnancies
2006
http://www.acog.org/publications/patient_education/bp069.cfm

Most women give birth between 38 and 42 weeks of pregnancy. But very few babies are born on their due dates. It is normal to give birth as much as 3 weeks before or 2 weeks after your due date.

A postterm pregnancy is one that lasts 42 weeks or longer.

Problems occur in only a small portion of postterm pregnancies. Most women who give birth after the due date have healthy newborns. Read the rest of this entry »

 

Your Body, Your Birth, Your Baby


The Mumma who wrote this – Birth Without Fear, is absolutely awesome!  She runs a Facebook group by that same name, and is currently encouraging over 6,300 women to birth without fear!  It’s a fantastic community – everyone supports one another, and there really is a lot of very healthy discussion about a whole range of issues. I’d fully encourage every pregnant woman, or even every woman thinking about becoming pregnant, to join that community, and either participate, or sit back and learn from some very learned ladies! https://www.facebook.com/birthwithoutfear 

Your Body, Your Birth, Your Baby

http://birthwithoutfearblog.com/2010/11/12/your-body-your-birth-your-baby/
by Birth Without Fear on November 12, 2010

OB, doctor, pregnancy, birthI do not know where women got the idea that doctors are a ‘knight in shining armor’ here to rescue them. Actually, the AMA has been incredible at making themselves fit that role. Regardless, it’s a lie.

When I hear a mama say, “They are going to let me…” I cringe. I absolutely want to vomit. Since when do they own you?! IT IS NOT UP TO THEM how and where you birth. It is up to YOU!

You have been deceived. Your doctor is not a knight in shining armor here to save the day. You do not have to just be happy with what they will and will not let you do. You do not need saving. Read the rest of this entry »

 

Pregnancy is not 40 weeks long


Wednesday, September 09, 2009

The Lie of the Estimated Due Date (EDD): Why Your Due Date Is Not What You Think
http://www.drmomma.org/2009/06/lie-of-estimated-due-date-edd-why-your.html

By Misha Safranski
posted with permission

We have it ingrained in our heads throughout our entire adult lives-pregnancy is 40 weeks. The “due date” we are given at that first prenatal visit is based upon that 40 weeks, and we look forward to it with great anticipation. When we are still pregnant after that magical date, we call ourselves “overdue” and the days seem to drag on like years. The problem with this belief about the 40 week EDD is that it is not based in fact. It is one of many pregnancy and childbirth myths which has wormed its way into the standard of practice over the years-something that is still believed because “that’s the way it’s always been done”. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on March 28, 2011 in All, Due dates, overdue

 

Due ‘date’? or due ‘month’?


I liked this article as it just helps build faith in your body.  I love the fact that it cites studies done into post-due-date research, to give women something concrete to give caregivers that may be pressuring them into unnecessary interventions. 

When was my last period? EDD & Postdates
October 13, 2010

http://birthingbliss.wordpress.com/2010/10/13/when-was-my-last-period-edd-postdates/

While sitting in the Midwife’s office after receiving the official pregnancy test result here comes the? When was your last period? What, I don’t know. With my head bowed I reply” I’ll have to ask Arthur.” I have not marked the date of my period or counted 28 days since high school. I’m one that feels when it’s near. If my diet is not in check I get argumentative, crave sugar & salt and have a desire to go to the beach. If nourishment is stellar the shifts are more subtle and I still want to go to the beach.

Next comes the sonograms. We don’t want to know the sex, please. As I pretend not to see the penis on the monitor the technician takes all the necessary measurements. Your expected due date is April 22. Wow! that is 3 weeks earlier than our calculations. Once again here comes the question, When was your last period? Honestly I can not answer with confidence but we think it was_. “We” she replies with a smile. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on March 16, 2011 in All, induction, overdue

 

OB fired during birth!


Mom fires OB during birth when threatened with a cesarean!

http://hypnobabies.wordpress.com/2010/06/01/mom-fires-ob-during-birth-when-threatened-with-a-cesarean/

I LOVE this birth story, because it shows how moms can be so powerful during their births!   Mom was induced at 42 weeks, but insisted that the pitocin was turned up slowly and refused to have her water broken. 

First off I have to thank all the wonderful women in this group. (Hypnobabies Yahoo Group) Without you and your wonderful stories I don’t think I would have had the confidence to go to the hospital to be induced with pit, and have a beautiful birth.  I was so nervous and upset the few nights before. Your stories gave me the reassurance that I could do this, and I did. Here is our story.

I think overall I let myself be pushed into inducing. We were at the 42wks the Dr. had guessed. My family was all becoming quite impatient and there was a lot of pressure to have her out.  I agreed to be induced and get things started. Read the rest of this entry »

 
 

Childbirth Facts What women should know about giving birth


10 Childbirth Facts

What women should know about giving birth

by Ceridwen Morris   |  November 16, 2010

 

http://www.babble.com/pregnancy/giving-birth/10-facts-childbirth-labor-delivery-signs-giving-birth/?page=1#slideshowholder

 

Fact 1: It’s not like the movies
In the movies, the water breaks, everyone panics, mom wobbles up, grabs her belly, and on cue has an enormous contraction, then yells for a taxi. In real life, the water usually breaks during labor and if it does break early, there’s no reason to run screaming to the hospital. Real-life labor is really hard, but it’s not one big screaming emergency. Every labor is unique, but perhaps none more “unique” than the mythical Hollywood birth.

 

Fact 2: Your due date is more like a due month
A full-term pregnancy is anywhere between 37 and 42 weeks. The estimated due date (EDD) is an educated guess, not a firm deadline. The majority of babies are born before or after their due dates; most first-time babies are born an average of four days past the EDD. It can be hard to mentally plan for a whole due month, but a due date is too specific. So, how about a due fortnight? Read the rest of this entry »

 
 
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