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Category Archives: Pelvic space

Heading Down the Road to C Section?



This article is written by an OB who has been practicing for 14 years. http://www.friscowomenshealth.com/?option=com_wordpress&Itemid=205&lang=en&p=89
I hope you enjoy.

Top Ten Signs Your Doctor Is Planning To Perform An Unnecessary Cesarean Section On You

I have been a practicing OB/GYN for fourteen years. I live in Frisco, Texas, one of the fastest growing cities in the United States, and I truly enjoy living and working here.  It is a great place for my family and, for the first time, my office is attached to the actual hospital I practice in.  This is the third and final place I will practice medicine.  I trained with some of the most respected academic OB/GYN’s in the country.  These physicians have contributed to books on Obstetrics, created practice guidelines for the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), and taught me to practice medicine based on scientific evidence.

I follow a few simple rules: do no harm, give your patients options, and provide information so they can make informed decisions.  So, last night I was sitting in my office looking at the fourth Cesarean Section (C/S) operative report of the day for yet another patient who wants to have a vaginal delivery following a previous C/S. I am frustrated and feel like I am fighting a losing battle.

When did Cesarean Sections (C/S) and elect Read the rest of this entry »

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Hints for Pushing


I love this article!  It has so many helpful hints and tips for how to let your pushing stage be straightforward and productive!  I wish I had read it when pregnant with my first!  This article talks a lot about primips – primips are women having their first babies, and multips are women who have already had one.  But either way, the advice in here is great. 🙂

http://www.glorialemay.com/blog/?p=72

Pushing for Primips

This article originally appeared in Midwifery Today Magazine, Issue 55 (Winter, 2000). “Primips”-women having their first babies.

-by Gloria Lemay
The expulsion of a first baby from a woman’s body is a space in time for much mischief and mishap to occur. It is also a space in time where her obstetrical future often gets decided and where she can be well served by a patient, rested midwife. Why do I make the distinction between primip pushing and multip pushing? The multiparous uterus is faster and more efficient at pushing babies out and the multiparous woman can often bypass obstetrical mismanagement simply because she is too quick to get any.

It actually amazes me to see multips [women having second or more babies] being shouted at to “push, push, push” on the televised births on “A Baby Story”. My experience is that midwives must do everything they can to slow down the pushing in multips because the body is so good at expelling those second, third and fourth babies. In most cases with multips, having the mother do the minimum pushing possible will result in a nice intact perineum. As far as direction from the midwife goes, first babies are a different matter. I am not saying they need to be pushed out forcefully or worked hard on. Rather, I say they require more time and patience on the part of the midwife, and a smooth birth requires a dance to a different tune. Read the rest of this entry »

 

The lie of the ‘too small’ pelvis


Small Pelvis? Here’s The Truth About Cephalopelvic Disproportion (CPD)

http://www.bellybelly.com.au/articles/birth/small-pelvis-big-baby-cpd

A diagnosis of CPD (cephalopelvic disproportion) is where the baby’s head is thought to be too large to pass through the woman’s pelvis.

In the 18th and 19th centuries, poor nutrition, rickets and illnesses such as polio caused pelvic anomalies, which resulted in loss of life during childbirth. Indeed initially CPD was the most common reason for carrying out a caesarean. In modern times, however, CPD is rare, since our general standard of living is so much higher and true CPD is more likely to be caused by pelvic fracture due to road traffic accidents or congenital abnormalities.

Often CPD is implied rather than diagnosed. In cases where labour has failed to progress or the baby has become distressed, medical staff commonly assume that this is due to physical inadequacies in the mother rather than look towards circumstances of the mother’s care. Read the rest of this entry »

 

Avoiding birth injuries for bub


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OD88c9dbiZg

This is a video that explains how some birth injuries occur, and how to avoid them.  For example, did you know your birth canal is 30% smaller when you are lying or semi-reclining on your back?  30%!!! Insane. And still so many medical institutions demand it of mothers.

Take control of your birth.  Look after your babies’ health.

 
 
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